SUCCESSFULLY INDUCTING NEW STAFF

Inducting your staff well makes a great first impression: It speaks volumes to a new staff member when you show them you are prepared and ready for their arrival.  You want your new employee  to feel welcome and see that you have prepared for their arrival.  Most of us has experienced a poor induction.   For example, arriving to your new job to find no desk or computer set up,  or arriving to find your manager is away and the office junior gives a quick tour around the premises as the “induction.”

This does not make for a good first impression of the business, nor does it inspire the your employee.  Those first 90 days are crucial to how your new employee will fit into the company and the HRtoolkit New Employee Checklist gives you a great outline for welcoming and successfully inducting your new staff

Here are some of the common pitfalls we come across, with companies not  preparing well for their new employee.  Sadly, we often hear about these situations too late – during the exit interview of an excellent employee.

  1. Confusion and frustration because the employee has no clear understanding of their role
  • As an employer you should have provided a clear job description during the hiring process
  1. Lack of communication from management about work expectations, outlining clearly:
  • The standard of work you expect
  • Explaining clearly what is required from the employee, when they are not meeting the standards
  • Give training/ coaching and support to reach that standard
  • Reach a sound decision during a 90 day trial.

Never exit a person on day 89 of the 90 day trial – it is high risk and unnecessary stress.  If you are following the above pointers, and you will be able to constructively manage the successful performance of your new employee. It is important to check your 90 day trial clause is valid.

Finally…Performance and goal setting is a discipline that should continue throughout your employee’s time with you.  You may think you cannot afford the time to coach staff, however if staff leave, the cost to the business is conservatively $25,000 often more.